3 fun activities to try in Utila, Honduras when you’re not a diver

It’s 6 pm and the sky turns to a deep dark blue, the air is thick and warm. We sit on a dock in Utila and browse the internet. Under us, black water laps hypnotically against the dock making us sleepy as if we’re babies in the cradle. Behind us, we can hear the slow dripping of wet suits.

We are sitting in a dive shop on a tiny island in the Caribbean sea called Utila. Utila belongs to Honduras, a country that travellers often skip or feel no need to go to. The ones who do go, most often end up in one of the islands, either on bigger and more luxurious Roatan or smaller and backpacker-friendly Utila. Continue Reading →

6 Things to do around Lago de Yojoa, Honduras

Travelling long term, we need to take a break from the classic backpacking sometimes and stay somewhere for a little while longer. If only to get some words on the paper. We hadn’t had such a break since we became carpenters in Finca Ixobel in Poptún. When I read about Lago de Yojoa – a tranquil lake which not only has lots of nature on its shore, but also a craft brewery – I was instantly convinced I had found the perfect spot for exactly that.

Life, however, is more than writing (and drinking beer), so we still made a couple of side trips. Here’s our list of things to do around Lago de Yojoa. Continue Reading →

Five things we learned about the Maya in Central America

Who doesn’t know the game in which one person says a word and the other one completes with the first thing that pops into your head? I have no idea about the purpose of the game, except to prove that you have a dirty mind. Until a year ago, if you’d asked me to play and threw the word ‘Maya’ at me, I’d probably have replied ‘the bee’.

What about you? Be honest. Unless you’ve visited Central America or have a degree in history, you likely don’t know much about the Maya. Continue Reading →

Between Gratitude and Hope on the Lenca Trail: travels into the mountainous west of Honduras

When thinking about indigenous people in Central America, the Maya are usually the ones that come to mind. We had our fair share/overdose of Maya culture in Belize and in Guatemala. Honduras has Maya too – exemplified by the ruins of Copán which we’d visit later in our trip. The most numerous indigenous group in this country, however, are the Lenca. They’re famous for their tenacity and their fluorescent headdresses. A sharp tourism marketing genius dubbed their homeland the Ruta Lenca or Lenca Trail. We were keen to explore those rugged and inhospitable mountains of southwestern Honduras and the string of traditional villages that lies within them. Continue Reading →